Data Storage Today

CIO Today Network Sites:   Top Tech News  |   CIO Today   |   Mobile Tech Today   |   Data Storage Today
News & Information for Data Storage Professionals
Eliminate costly downtime!
Find out how with Free White Paper
& enter to win a Samsung Galaxy Note

www.apc.com
Thursday, April 24th 
Next Generation Data Center Is Here!
Trending Topics:   Security Heartbleed Big Data Cloud Computing Windows XP Data Centers OS X Mavericks
Home
Data Centers
Storage Solutions
Storage Networks
Data Storage Issues
Data Security
DST Press Releases
 
Free Newsletters
Top CIO News
 
Mobile Tech Today
 

Tech Trends

Prices Plummet for Solid-State Drives

Prices Plummet for Solid-State Drives
June 22, 2012 2:06PM

Bookmark and Share
At the same time that SSDs have plummeted in price, their competitors, spinning hard disk drives, have seen price jumps as much as 50 percent because of floods last year in Thailand, where many of the HDDs are manufactured. The floods have devastated parts of the country. Most SSD manufacturers are located in Korea and Japan.

Your Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems: the world's most advanced converged infrastructure are built on the Cisco Unified Computing System with Intel® Xeon® processors. Vblock™ Systems deliver extraordinary time to market, ROI and TCO, and flexibility to meet your continually changing demands with 5X faster deployment, 96% less downtime, and 1/2 the cost. Click here to learn more.

Solid-state drives (SSDs) were once premium storage -- fast, stable, durable and pricey. Now, a steady and dramatic decline in prices indicates that the last adjective may be permanently dropped from the storage medium's descriptors.

Prices for SSDs have fallen as much as 65 percent over the last year from such name-brand makers as Intel, OCZ and Crucial. Last year at this time, a 256 GB SSD might set a buyer back $500 or more. Now the same-size drive goes for less than $200. For some SSD models, the price-per-GB is now as low as about 65 cents.

Floods in Thailand

The reasons behind the steep price drop include lower prices for NAND flash memory chips and for controllers, plus competition among makers.

At the same time that SSDs have plummeted in price, their competitors, spinning hard disk drives, have seen price jumps as much as 50 percent because of floods last year in Thailand, where many of the drives are manufactured. The floods have devastated parts of the country, killing hundreds of people and damaging factories. Most SSD manufacturers are located in Korea and Japan.

Because of the rapid price drops and SSD's features, sales of SSDs have increased substantially, while HDDs have reportedly dropped as much as 40 percent for some models.

An example of the radical price drop is Intel's 240 GB model in its 520 Series, whose price at the NewEgg retailer fell from about $550 at the end of February to just above $300 by March and April. The model uses the SandForce SF-2281 controller, a common component in SSDs, and other SandForce-using SSDs show a similar price trajectory.

For instance, the Corsair Force Series GT 240 GB unit dropped from nearly $500 in September of last year to about $250 now. The OCZ Vertex 3 240 GB demonstrated a similar price decline over roughly the same period.

HDD Sales Drop

Both models use the SandForce controller and resemble the Intel drive, and all three use synchronous NAND. SSDs that employ the less expensive asynchronous NAND, such as the Corsair Force Series 3 240 GB or the OCZ Agility 240 GB, have shown a similar price decline.

SSDs with other controllers have also gotten cheaper, such as the OCZ Octane 128 GB, which uses a Marvell controller and has dropped about 40 percent in the last six months.

For years, analysts have contended that, as great as SSDs were, hard disk drives would remain less expensive per unit of storage. The price difference per GB between HDDs and SSDs in 2005, for instance, was 33 to 1. By 2006, that had dropped to 19 to 1.

Now, with per-GB costs for some SSDs as low as 65 cents, the significant cost differential between the two kinds of storage may permanently become a memory of things past. OCZ Technology, for instance, has said that new kinds of NAND flash memory will continue to drive prices down on their models.

SSDs have also changed their status, moving from luxury items to required components for such new product lines as Intel design-specified Ultrabooks, Apple's new Retina Display MacBook Pro, and the newest MacBook Air.

Tell Us What You Think
Comment:

Name:



 Tech Trends
1. Net Gets Faster, But Easier to Attack
2. Samsung Gear Fit Geared for Exercise
3. Poll: A Mix of Feelings on Future Tech
4. 'Like' Cheerios, Give Up Right To Sue
5. Google Earnings, Sales Disappoint




 Most Popular Articles
1. Intel Bets on Cloudera for Big Data Analytics
2. SAP HANA Data Warehouse App Gets Faster Analytics
3. Fast Seagate 6 TB Drive Offered for Enterprise Data Centers
4. Resetting All Passwords Now May Be Worst Heartbleed Fix
5. ManageEngine Plug-In Monitors Data Center Security


Have an informed opinion on this story?
Send a Letter to the Editor.
We want to know what you think.
Send us your Feedback.

 Related Topics  Latest News & Special Reports

  Lessons from Verizon's Threat Report
  Officials Reveal Microsoft Data Center
  Verizon Report Exposes Cyberthreats
  Samsung Data Center Catches Fire
  Heartbleed Exploit Could Cost Millions

 Technology Marketplace
Business Intelligence
Get real-time, cloud-based information services with Neustar.
 
Cloud Computing
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
 
Contact Centers
HP delivers the future of the contact center with HP Qfiniti 10.
 
Data Storage
Next Generation Data Center Is Here! Vblock™ Systems from VCE
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Enterprise Hardware
Barium Ferrite (BaFe) is the future of tape.
2.5" Enterprise-class SATA & SAS SSDs for server & storage applications
 
Hardware
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 
Network Security
Protect your network with APC Smart-UPS battery backup
 

Network Security Spotlight
What Verizon's Data Breach Report Can Teach Enterprises
It’s probably not a jaw-dropper, but cyberespionage is officially on the rise. And the use of stolen or misused credentials is still the leading way the bad guys gain access to corporate information.
 
Top Cyberthreats Exposed by Verizon Report
Beyond Heartbleed, there are cyberthreats vying to take down enterprise networks, corrupt smartphones, and wreak havoc on businesses. Verizon is exposing these threats in a new report.
 
Where Do Web Sites Stand, Post-Heartbleed?
A security firm says the vast majority of Web sites have patched themselves to protect against the Heartbleed bug, but now there are questions raised on the reliability of open-source programs.
 
Navigation
Data Storage Today
Home/Top News | Data Centers | Storage Solutions | Storage Networks | Data Storage Issues | Data Security | DST Press Releases
Also visit these Enterprise Technology Sites
Top Tech News | CIO Today | Mobile Tech Today | Data Storage Today

Services:
FreeNewsFeed | Free Newsletters | XML/RSS Feed

About CIO Today Network | How To Contact Us | Article Reprints | Services for PR Pros (In partnership with NewsFactor) | Top Tech Wire | How To Advertise

Privacy Policy | Terms of Service
© Copyright 2000-2014 Data Storage Today. All rights reserved. Article rating technology by Blogowogo. Member of Accuserve Ad Network.